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20130121
20130129
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Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)
are actually safer today now that the gun ban unscented in 2004. if you look at the fbi statistics, the murder rate has plummeted and gone through the floor. we are actually safer today with these firearms being legal. >> that is ridiculous and all proportions, with all due respect. [talking over each other] [talking over each other] >> these are not assault weapons. >> he is asserting itself as the assault weapon ban was lifted, we are safer. [talking over each other] [talking over each other] >> the murder rate has plummeted. what are you going to say about that, richard? [talking over each other] [talking over each other] >> anybody can google the fbi statistics and look for themselves. 2004 until 2011 -- take a look and i invite them to do that. lou: let me say this. it is true that more people die in this country every year as a result of being hit with a club or a hammer than a rifle. that includes all rifles, which would include assault weapons and the so-called assault weapons. it is, if you will, one of the lesser aspects of the problem of guns and how they are used to commit crimes.
threatening e-mails from an anonymous sender. the fbi got involved and discovered the e-mails came from paula broadwell, a biographer who it turns out had an affair with the man she wrote about, that man, general david petraeus and resigned cia director after the story went public just after the election. three months later she wants her story out. is it a little too late? >> well, nobody cares. i mean, really, and what's interesting about it, she actually complains in the pa piece that she came out and wrote that nobody would move on. and then everybody's moved on and then she wants to talk about it. >> jon: yes. vicky, you were offered the story. >> i was offered the story and i turned her down because i was offered two terms. the first, could she have the cover and i have a big piece coming out which addressed the real issue about jill kelley, i would disagree kirsten, one question that matters is how does somebody like this have access to general petraeus and general allen and are we safe as a result? i mean, that's, that is the real question. but no, she asked me for the-- to the intervi
. >> reporter: hey there. the fbi and local turkish police have joined the search for the 33-year-old wife and mother of two. she was last seen leaving her istanbul hostel for dinner monday night and seems to have vanished, leaving her passport, clothing and phone chargers. family members tell fox newschannel, sierra is a photographer and she left her staten island home to take pictures in istanbul, january 7. she checked in with them frequently, texting her family and skyping with her two children daily. her sister received a text from her monday morning, but no one has heard from her since. she was planning to return home on tuesday, january 25. but she missed her family and decided to move up her flight to the 22nd. when her husband went to pick her up, she never showed. >> you know, you have so many stories going through your mind, you don't know what to think, you don't know what to believe. you don't know what to expect. you don't know what's going to come out of this. >> reporter: steven is traveling to turk tow meet with the local authorities. the couple have been married 14 years
's still subject of the fbi investigation. >> john: as we just heard senator paul called secretary clinton's actions inexcusable and said she did not read her cables. >> any requests, any of the cables having to do with security did not come to my attention. 1.43 million cables come through the state department. they're all addressed to me. >> cenk: does that make sense to you? is that fair? >> sure, i've heard political hyperbole that suggests that the tragic death of four americans in benghazi rivals in some way to 9/11 in terms of its impact forgetting about afghanistan. 20,000 soldiers were dead. iraq where 4,000 soldiers died in service the country. i think it's ridiculous. i was an assistant secretary of state, and the secretary paid me and others of my colleagues to sort through information that came through our respective channels and report to her issues of significance and particularly issues that couldn't be resolveed at a lower level. i mean, obviously as the accountability review board indicated there were mistakes made. there were misjudgments made, and under estimations of t
, intelligence analysts will be working around the clock. our hostage negotiators. >> reporter: that fbi official spoke to us inside the multiagency communications center, real time monitoring of surveillance cameras posted on buildings and roads and share tips and incidenident reports. with checkpoints, monitoring stations and other precautions, this stage, the parade route along pennsylvania avenue, where the real unknown comes in. often along here where the president gets out of his car. that's when the president is most exposed and the crowds are massive. >> if he gets out of his car and walks, what's going through your mind at that moment? >> through my mind is having faith hain the plan and assumin that the agents are doing their job. >> reporter: haggin says the secret service o choreographs where he gets out of the limo and where he gets back in. when it's all over? a big sigh of relief. >> an event of this magnitude takes hundreds of thousands to execute effectively. and those people tend to not have a whole lot of fun. >> reporter: no matter how smoothly the day goes, security officials
.c. police force, secret service, fbi, and other agencies. bob orr takes a closer look at the security behind this ceremony. >> reporter: at union station, tsa viper security teams are checking trains and passengers. in a show of force designed to be a deterrent. >> if someone walks in and sees a group of officers and turns around immediately and leaves the station, that's a good indication that perhaps they have something to hide. >> reporter: not all security is so obvious. these two men with backpacks are undercover behavioral detection officers working in tandem with uniformed patrols at rail stations and airports. along d.c.'s waterfront coast guard fast boats are increasing surveillance runs. this is a floating command center. for 48 hours surrounding the inaugural time frame these waters around washington will be closed as more than 20 coast guard and police boats conduct patrols of 20 miles of shore watch. and at the edges of the restricted zone, the coast guard is watching for any suspect boaters. >> if they're in key specific areas or near critical
attacks in kenya and tanzania, the fbi put bin laden on their ten most wanted list. secretary of state madeleine albright escorted home the bodies of 10 of the 12 americans who were killed in those attacks. since 1970, not a year has gone by where there has not been some sort of violent attack against u.s. diplomats and diplomatic facilities around the world. not all of them are deadly, but they happen all the time, year after year after year. and nobody is more aware of that than whoever is the secretary of state at the time. and our secretary of state right now is hillary clinton. who was on capitol hill today to testify about the latest deadly attack on u.s. diplomats. the attack in benghazi. >> benghazi joins a long list of tragedies for our department, for other agencies, and for america. hostages taken in tehran in 1979, our embassy and marine barracks bombed in beirut in 1983, khobar towers in saudi arabia in 1996. our embassies in east africa in 1998. consulate staff murdered in jetta in 2004. the khost attack and many others. i could give you a long list of attacks averted, th
limits. choppers are overhead that started last evening as well. the fbi sending out a lot of agents. the bureau says there are no credible threats against this event today but they will be watching everybody very closely. bill: you can imagine planning for this is years in the making. first the president and vice sco arrive at the capitol building at 10:50 a.m. eastern time. they will be punctual. the swearing in will happen right at 11:55 a.m., about an hour later. then there is lunch. the parade will start at 2:40 eastern time this afternoon. the balls will begin later tonight. the first one, inaugural ball at 6:00 p.m. that will honor servicemembers and their families. the commander-in-chief's ball started by president bush number 43, martha. martha: the parade is a long tradition of the inaugural parade. dates back to the first president, george washington. our first president's parade was in new york city where he took the office on steps of federal hall, 1789 is when that took place of course. thomas jefferson's inauguration in 1801 was the first to take place in the new capit
in the field. myself, the head of the fbi and keith alexander have worked very closely together to develop playbooks and to ascertain who has what roles and responsibilities in different scenarios. in civilian space, our ability to detect, prevent, and mitigate its assisted based on whether we know something has occurred. the idea of sharing and getting notice, particularly when the infiltrated entity is part of the nation's critical impasse structure that everybody else relies upon, is key. the ability to undertake certain medications -- mitigation measures is key. the ability to hire personnel without some other restrictions of the civil service -- civil service system is key. legislation would have the effect of clarifying, making sure those responsibilities are in statute. >> why don't you explain what's physma is. >> i will let you explain what is. >> finish your sentence, request that is a concept -- >> finish your sentence. >> that is a concept -- anyway, legislation will be critical. part of our job is to educate congress on what is going on out there. educate the public. we say cy
of crimes or guilty of anything, but simply people that are somehow peripheral to an investigation. the fbi relies, in the first thing as what is a driver's license, like on television. so what kind of publications can you envision an estate like a worm where 40% of the people are carrying not for federal identification to the fbi director has touched by three times how important the real id act is for federal law enforcement. >> two things with that, and it's been very, very troublesome for us, again, it's hardcoded in the real id act itself that you have to mark a negative card. and a year ago we were two years and i specifically asked at an awards meeting at each is represented, we're having all the unintended consequent of the negative markings on the card, what is your recommendation? and the recommendation i got back was quit marking the card negatively than. which was a little bit stressful because it's hardcoded in real id act itself. and our 80 in delaware said have to abide by the law as it is written. but a lot of our citizens in delaware said okay, other states are not marking t
the fbi to have time to do their job, and what difference does it make whether they knew exactly what it was right away. >> stephanie: right. >> and they are still trying to figure out out like we all are. >> stephanie: but in the heat of a tragedy, and she has just been told her friend and ambassador had been killed, she is going to go wait a minute, was there a video? >> it shows their fixation on unimportant details. we're getting more and more information, and you know -- >> stephanie: yeah. >> this is what happens when you see republicans spoiling for a fight when there is nothing to fight over. >> what is to fight over is who cut funding for embassy security. >> exactly. where the hell do they get off complaining about this at all? >> stephanie: thank you. and john mccain was just shaking his fist and i'm glad to see -- oh i'm just fighting with myself! >> well he can be slightly forgiven he had to endure another inauguration from the man who beat him. i was not sitting too far from the president during the inauguration and he was sitting next to orrin hatch,
anything with patrick swayze. >> you mean the fbi is going to pay me to serve. [ laughter ] >> woe! >> most heinous. >> stephanie: isn't that how it ends, right? patrick swayze goes surfing and presumably kills himself -- >> well, there he goes again. >> i'm performing tomorrow night at the blue state ball in indianapolis. >> awesome. >> come on down if you are there and freezing. >> stephanie: because you weren't busy enough. >> i have no life. i love you all. >> stephanie: thank you, honey. we'll have tina dupuy next on the "stephanie miller show." ♪ [♪ theme music ♪] >> stephanie: hello tv world. tina dupuy coming up right after the break here. jacki schechner? >> yes. >> stephanie: i always like to do one story a day that makes me feel better about my pathetic love life. woman choked man for hogging blanket. [ laughter ] >> stephanie: he was trying to get more of the blanket, as men do. she called police, and was highly intoxicated however. >> that warrens a 911 call. he also won't get me a glass of water. >> stephanie: all right. here she is my bff, jacki
are in front of the fbi headquarters. you're seeing series of reactions from people. i think one of the things that i am marveled at is how many people have iphones and iphone technology. here we go, brian! the vehicles are being approached. the crowd is screaming. brian, this is our moment. here we go. there you have it. the first lady of the united states and the president making their first exit from the vehicle, as anticipated. here we are, brian. they are holding hands as you can see and walking along this blue line that illuminate for lack of a better description, the parade route. there they are. this couple that we witnessed four years ago with their young children, coming to this town and, now, the first lady and the president making this walk for the final time from the distance that we see here. they are smiling. as you can see, they are waving and the crowd, as we say, is going crazy right now, brian. enthusiastic, happy, and there are smiles as far as you can see and cameras. i've never seen so many 6-year-olds with iphones that can snap pictures on their phone. it's so exciting a
cia chief is spying. >> we see more vips arriving right now. bob mueller, fbi director, at the bottom of the screen with his wife. long-serving fbi director. we saw the acting cia director, michael morrell walking in. incoming, assuming, he is confirmed cia director, john brennan, coming in. watching what's going on. this year, you can also be part of cmn's coverage of this president a coverage of the inauguration. explain away. >> reporter: everybody here hold up your phones. this crowd has phones. this is the first time we have had a presidential inauguration with instagram. the most socially connected political event ever because of these. so we here at cnn are asking you because this is about you. this is about the community. we want to you take a picture of yourself watching inauguration, watching the swearing-in, on capitol hill, today. we want you to upload it to instagram. this is about you sharing your view of history with us. include a caption. why is this for for you to be watching this historic occasion here on this monday in washington. we have already gotten a couple of
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)